Category Archives: Acura

Acura MDX

Acura MDX front

 

Acura MDX also known as Honda MDX in certain part of the world is luxury 3 row  crossover SUV produced by Honda’s luxury Car maker Acura. MDX stands for ‘ Multi Dimensional Luxury’. MDX was the first luxury SUV with third row.

Acura MDX was introduced in 2001 which replaced the Honda SLX. Over the period of 14 years MDX has gained technology makeover and all new 2015 MDX is real luxury & Electronically equipped SUV.

The body is much sleeker, with improved aerodynamics; it has lots the blocky, somewhat blunt look of its predecessor. Acura’s big SUV continues to offer seating for seven and a single engine option. The 3.5-liter V-6 is new, now fitted with direct injection and returning better fuel economy than before. Acura also added advanced safety features to the MDX’s roster, including radar-based cruise control and a collision-warning system.

This generation is the first to offer a front-wheel-drive MDX, perhaps to widen its appeal to those in warmer climates who don’t need all-wheel drive and its attendant fuel-economy penalty. The Super-Handling All-Wheel Drive system is once again available. Handling is still crisp for a crossover, but the latest MDX has lost some of the edge of the previous model. Those who prioritize comfort will of course see that as a good thing.

Acura MDX interior

the interior of MDX is pretty spacious clad with a 7 inch touchscreen with haptic feedback , an additional 8-inch screen is also standard. To reduce interior noise an acoustic (acoustic PVB) windshield, acoustic front door glass and thicker rear glass are used as well as triple sealed door openings. Advance package models include further noise reduction using a thicker carpet base layer and front fender liners. . The MDX rides lower reducing its center of gravity.

According to Acura the external is more streamlined decreasing move by 16% with the new design lapping Nürburgring 8 a few moments quicker than its forerunner. The front lights are Acura’s Gemstone Eye LED Headlights (first presented on the RLX). Each headlamp uses five individual LED resources with three used for low-beam illumination and two for high-beam illumination. LED fender set up fog lights are provided as a supplier set up option.

The Present MDX comes in two options Front wheel drive option and Acura’s Super Handling All wheel Drive ( SH – AWD ). Both powered by 3.5L V6 Gasoline engine.

Engine & Performance

3.5 L Single overhead cam (SOHC)
V6 24
Variable 267 ft-lbs. @ 4500 rpm
290 hp @ 6200 rpm 37.6 ft.

Fuel

Gas Premium unleaded (required)
19.5 gal 390.0/546.0 miles
20/28 mpg

Price

FRONT WHEEL DRIVE  –  STARTING AT $42,765
20 | 28 | 23 mpg rating

SUPER HANDLING
ALL-WHEEL DRIVE™ (SH-AWD®) – 
STARTING AT $44,765
18 | 27 | 21 mpg rating

Acura’s Super Car – NSX

Acura NSX Front

Acura NSX is one of the most awaited cars . The concept version was same was shown early in 2012 and has created much hype among the sports car lovers. Acura NSX concept is successor of Honda’s early NSX sports car which was powered by V6 mid placed gasoline engine powering the rear wheels.

The new Generation NSX 2015 is powered by v6 hybrid powertrain with 3 motor twin turbocharged engine to propel the monster.he sexy, show-stopping shape features Acura’s softening Keen Edge design. Dimensionally, it measures 3.7 inches shorter in length on a 1.8-inch longer wheelbase, so overhangs are cropped. It’s also 3.3 inches wider and 0.4 inch lower than the 2005 NSX. The concept rides on 255/35-19 front and 275/30-20 rear rubber.

Acura NSX Rear

The new 2015 Acura comes with a sexy all muscle Acura’s standard grille and a heart throbbing aerodynamic looks.  while the interior of the vehicle is a absolute cockpit. The Sport Hybrid SH-AWD uses a trio of electric motors — one mated to the engine and two driving the front wheels — to help boost the V-6 engine’s performance and overall vehicle stability. The latest concept’s engine hooked up to a dual-clutch transmission and we expect the same from the production model.

Acura NSX interior

2015 ACURA NSX BASE PRICE – $130,000*

  • VEHICLE LAYOUT – Mid-engine, AWD, 2-pass, 2-door coupe
  • ENGINE – 3.7L DOHC 24-valve V-6 + 2 front and 1 rear electric motors; 480 hp comb*
  • TRANSMISSION – 7-speed twin-cl autoCURB WEIGHT3100 lb*
  • WHEELBASE – 101.4 in
  • LENGTH X WIDTH X HEIGHT – 170.5 x 74.6 x 45.7 in
  • 0-60 MPH – 3.0 sec*
  • EPA CITY/HWY FUEL ECON – Not yet rated

ON SALE IN U.S. – 2015

 

 

Acura RDX

Acura RDX front

 

Acura RDX is Acura’s  first all muscle compact luxury SUV from Japanese car maker. Acura RDX was shown first time in New york Auto show as a concept car and soon it went to sale in third quarter of 2009. RDX comes with standard Acura stylish Grille and premium looks in two options the basic front wheel drive and the higher version of all wheel drive equipped with Honda’s intelligent control system.

When other makers are replacing large V-6 engines with smaller turbocharged fours, Acura has taken the RDX in the other direction. The current Acura RDX , which was introduced for the 2013 model year, is powered by a 273-horsepower, 3.5-liter V-6, paired to a six-speed automatic transmission. The new power train maintains the prodigious power of the earlier model while making it easier to drive. It also delivers better fuel efficiency, with a combined EPA rating of 23 mpg for front-wheel drive models and 21 mpg for all-wheel drive versions–both improvements on the prior model.

RDX is built with premium quality interior. Dashboard and console are ensures second glance from the auto lovers. Equipped with electronic gadgets and features RDX can be classified as one of the best in segment for its driver cabin comfort and luxuriousness, though interior is not so spacious and specially second row lacks comfort. When it comes to safety RDX is the best pick of IIHS ( insurance institute for highway safety).

The latest RDX aims more toward families than sporting enthusiastic drivers. Leather seating, heated/power front seats, a power moonroof, and a 360-watt audio system are on the standard-features list, while the top Tech Package includes navigation with real-time traffic and rerouting; a power rear tailgate; and an Acura/ELS surround sound system.

ACura RDX side view

 

Acura RLX

Accura RLX front

Acura RLX is a masterpiece from Honda’s Luxury Car maker Acura. RLX is much similar to its other family members with standard Acura Grille and premium quality interior. RLX comes in 2 models , the standard 310 hp , V6 engine with variable cylinder management & RLX sport hybrid 377 hp model powered by 3 motor sport hybrid system . Former comes with all wheel steer feature while later is provided with all wheel drive.

Those who want more powerful performance will be steered toward the Game Multiple SH-AWD design.A hybridized  V-6 pushes the top side tires, while an all-electric back differential with two engines delivers twisting to the back tires, re-creating electronically the all-wheel-drive wonder that Acura has for so long been able to make with its technological Extremely Managing All-Wheel Generate program. The technological innovation intelligence increase to the seven-speed dual-clutch transmitting in enhance side, which uses the back power engines to get things going from a quit, which prevents the propensity of dual-clutches to step off in a jerky, non luxurious way. The result of all this is improvement and fantastic handling, with all-electric twisting vectoring at the back to keep the car constant and aid turn-in. While performance is the concern over energy performance with this hybrid program, it still increases mileage to 28 mpg town and 32 road.

Interior

Accura RLX interior

The RLX’s design is handsome in a nondescript sort of way. Inoffensive but forgettable. There isn’t much to attract the eye, and nothing to turn it away either. The biggest risk Acura took was with the jeweled headlights, which don’t do much to spruce up the otherwise bland front end.The cabin is a pretty functional, handsome place to check off driving tasks, but it’s more of the same. It falls in the gap between the opposing ways drivers tend to define luxury: it doesn’t wrap itself in the precisely modern design cues that define most Audi cockpits, or in the pervasive sense of old (and new) money that fills every Jaguar cabin. Cadillac is doing fantastic interiors in this class, too, and the choice of materials and grains and glosses are as point-perfect in the Acura RLX.

Engine

  • Engine Type  – Aluminum-alloy direct injection V-6
  • Displacement – 3.5 liters
  • Valvetrain – 24-valve, SOHC i-VTEC®
  • Horsepower @ rpm (SAE net) – 310 @ 6500 rpm
  • Torque (lb-ft @ rpm) (SAE net) – 272 @ 4500 rpm
  • Compression Ratio – 11.5:1
  • Throttle Control – Drive-by-Wire™ throttle system
  • EPA Fuel Economy Ratings (city / highway / combined) – 20 / 31 / 24
  • Recommended Fuel – Premium unleaded 91 octane
  • CARB Emissions Rating – ULEV-2
  • Tune-Up Interval – No scheduled tune-ups required for 100,000 +/- miles

Price 

Acura RLX 2015 –  starts at 48,450 US Dollars

Acura RLX Sport Hybrid – starts at 59,550 US Dollars

 

 

 

 

Acura TLX

 

 

Accura TLX Front

Acura TLX was first revealed as TLX  prototype which was supposed to take over earlier models TL & TSX.  Much like its brand image Acura TLX  is a much refined and stylish sedan. Acura TLX comes with sharp look , sporty color options standard Acura Grille at the front. Acura TLX surpasses the  features and looks of its earlier models TL & TSX .

Shoppers may be surprised to find that the four-cylinder TLX comes in only two trim levels, Base and Tech. Both are front-wheel drive and feature a new eight-speed dual-clutch automatic, 17-inch aluminum wheels, and common segment amenities like cruise control, speed-sensitive intermittent wipers, a leather steering wheel, heated front seats, and dual-zone climate control. Selecting the Tech package allotted to our test car adds a suite of features. Highlights include leather seats and door trim, a navigation system with voice recognition, rain-sensing wipers, and a premium 10-speaker audio system with voice activation. There are also safety items such as Lane Keeping Assist, blind-spot and rear cross-traffic monitoring, and forward-collision mitigation.

Accura Rear

ENGINE 

The engine lineup for the TLX is going to look suspiciously familiar to anyone who’s configured a Honda Accord, but the Acura folks assure us that the 2.4-liter inline-four and 3.5-liter V6 are unique to the uplevel brand.

The base engine is a direct-injected DOHC 2.4-liter inline four. It’s good for 206 hp at 6,800 rpm and 182 lb-ft of torque at @ 4,500 rpm. If you want to verify Acura’s claims of uniqueness, you can look up the motor by its official model name: K24W7.

The beefier motor, a direct-injected SOHC 3.5-liter V6, puts out 290 at 6,200 rpm and 267 lb-ft at 4,500 rpm. A member of the Honda J engine family, its designation is J35Y6.

To goose fuel economy, SH-AWD-equipped V6 cars get an idle-stop function; using active engine mounts, Acura says it can reduce the jarring start-stop jolts that plague similar systems. During testing, we scarcely noticed the system in operation — so we’ll mark that as a success on Acura’s part.

A sportier version of the TLX was repeatedly hinted at by Acura personnel, but there’s no saying what might be under the hood of that. Honda’s rekindled interest in forced induction raises some interesting possibilities, though. Hey, the racing version of the TLX uses a twin-turbo V6, so we can dream.

MODELS & PRICING 

At 73.0 inches across and 190.3 inches from nose to tail, the TLX is longer and wider than the TSX, but an inch narrower and 3.7 inches shorter than the TL. Thankfully, that trim comes from the overhangs — the front is down 1.1 inches and the rear, 2.7. The top of the roof is also half an inch closer to the pavement.

Compared to the TL, the TLX achieves a smaller footprint without sacrificing any of the interior space of its predecessor. If you fit in that one, you’ll fit nicely in this one; we managed to fit three adult males (one 6 foot, one 6-5 and the last 6-8) in the car for the test drive. So long as your author, the 6-footer, sat in the back, everyone seemed to get along nicely.

The car is rather handsome in person, to boot. The visual bloat of the outgoing TL is gone along with the controversial Power Plenum (perhaps you know it as the Acura beak). It’s not exactly breathtaking, but it looks good — and, perhaps more importantly for the Acura brand, it is distinct from the Accord sedan, a dignified car in its own right.

Inside, you’ll find a center stack cleaner than the ones we’ve seen in recent Acuras. There are two screens: one displays audio and navigation functions (on navigation-equipped cars), and the other, a touch-sensitive unit, displays climate information and varying audio/navigation/car setup functions. Redundant physical buttons should satisfy those who prefer a more tactile experience.

Seats are comfortable; not as cushy as a Lexus, not as upright as something from the Germans. There are touches of wood on the center console, dashboard and door panels, but it’s certainly not the richest or trendiest veneer in the class — we’d probably give that one to the open-grain accents from Audi, whose interiors seem all-around better designed (even if you’ll have to pay to get features, like dual climate control, that come standard on the Acura).

There are a variety of trim levels available, and depending on how you option your TLX, you can tack nearly 50 percent in extras on to the base car’s price. Fortunately, in Honda/Acura fashion, comfort, technology and safety upgrades are all combined into a handful of trim packages.

A base 2.4-liter TLX starts at $31,890; for a base 3.5-liter car, you’re in $36,115. Though these cars get goodies like keyless entry, push-button ignition, dual climate zones and LED headlights, you’ll have to step up to the Technology package — $35,920 for the 2.4-liter cars, $40,141 for 3.5-liter cars — to enjoy a GPS navigation system, blind spot and forward collision warnings and lane-keeping features, rain-sensing wipers and a premium leather interior. At the top of the heap is the Advance package (not available on 2.4-liter cars), which adds parking sensors, puddle lights, active cruise control and more. On front-wheel drive 3.5-liter cars, the Advance package brings the total to $43,395.

We’d lean toward some varation of the V6-powered SH-AWD car. It is available with the Technology package for $42,345; stepping up to the Advance package pushes you to a lofty $45,595 sticker.

MILEAGE

Two-wheel drive, four-cylinder:  24/35/28 mpg

Two-wheel drive, six-cylinder:  21/34/25 mpg

All-wheel drive, six-cylinder:  21/31/25 mpg

The All New ACCURA ILX 2015


Accura ILX is a compact sedan which fits perfectly for entry level luxury sedan from Honda’s luxury car maker Accura. ILX’s design is based on Honda civic. It comes in two variants 2.0 L 150 hp and 2.4 L 201 hp engine. the former comes with 5 speed automatic whereas later comes with 6 speed manual transmission.


The ILX features classic sedan proportions – an elongated hood with a short rear deck. An upward sweeping character line stretches from the front fender to muscular haunch. 17′ aluminum alloy wheels are standard on all models and complete the sporting look.



The concept version of both the gasoline and hybrid models was unveiled at the 2012 North American International Auto Show. The production versions were presented in the 2012 Chicago Auto Show. Mass production commenced on April 23 at Honda’s assembly facility in Greensburg, Indiana and U.S. sales began on May 22. The ILX introduces a new design that Acura calls “aero-fused dynamics”.
The EPA fuel economy rating of the hybrid version is 39 mpg-US (6.0 L/100 km; 47 mpg-imp) for city and 38 mpg-US (6.2 L/100 km; 46 mpg-imp) on highway driving.

Major options are grouped into Premium and Technology packages and include leather upholstery, 17″ alloy wheels, navigation system, premium audio system with SiriusXM satellite radio, and high intensity discharge headlamps. Both option packages include a multi-view rear camera with regular, wide-angle, and top-down modes.The ILX’s body in white uses 59% high strength steel ranging from 440-980 MPa yield strength grades, aluminum is used for the hood and front bumper beam.[7] Compared to the Civic the ILX uses Acura’s “Amplitude Reactive” dampers and a larger more rigid steering shaft for improved handling and ride quality characteristics.
For the 2014 model year the ILX came standard with 17-inch wheels, leather interior, heated front seats, an 8-way power driver’s seat, tri-angle backup camera and audio subwoofer with Active Noise Cancellation, however price was increased by $1000.

The ILX  Luxury sedan comes with luxury interiors. It features a 8 way adjustable leather seat , a highly comfortable steering wheel to control the lots of control buttons provided and a incredible 10 speakers surround sound audio system which gives a joy of music better than a theater. Rear view camera eases the parking and reverse driving operations. 

Models And Pricing
2015 ILX 5-Speed Automatic $27,050
2015 ILX 5-Speed Automatic with Premium Package $29,350
2015 ILX 5-Speed Automatic with Technology Package $31,750
2015 ILX 6-Speed Manual with Premium Package $29,350

ACCURA TL

     ACCURA TL

                                                          The Acura TL has traditionally been one of the better choices available for a midsize luxury sport sedan. Though the TL typically does not deliver the excitement or prestige of competing European sedans, it counters with exceptional value and above-average durability and reliability.
                                         The prevailing trend is for cars to get larger and more powerful with each redesign, and such was the case with the Acura TL’s newest makeover. The current model is the largest TL yet and offers more interior room; a powerful V6 engine and available all-wheel drive help compensate for the added curb weight. Today’s TL also boasts a host of gadgets and gizmos that represent the latest in automotive technology.
                                                                          The current (fourth) generation may have upped the ante, but cutting-edge technology and bracing performance are nothing new for the TL. Older TLs are still known for their engaging handling and plentiful amenities and should make a fine choice for a used luxury sport sedan.

Current Acura TL

Now in its fourth generation, the current TL boasts a brasher look, highlighted by aggressive lines and a dramatic-looking front grille. The current model offers more interior room than the third-generation TL, as well as more power under the hood, and its ride is more compliant than its predecessor’s.
Buyers have a choice of two trims: a base model and the sportier SH-AWD. Base cars (which are front-wheel drive) are motivated by a 3.5-liter V6 that kicks out 280 horsepower. As its name suggests, the SH-AWD version is all-wheel drive, and it’s powered by a 3.7-liter V6 good for 306 hp. A five-speed automatic transmission with steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters is standard on both trims and a six-speed manual is available on the SH-AWD.
Base models are pretty well equipped, offering standard features such as 17-inch wheels, xenon headlights, a sunroof, leather upholstery and an eight-speaker stereo with an in-dash six-CD changer. In addition to all-wheel drive and a more powerful engine, the SH-AWD adds upgraded brakes, 18-inch alloy wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, sportier steering feel and performance-themed upholstery and metallic trim.
TL enthusiasts cherish the car for its cutting-edge gadgetry, and the current model does not disappoint. Standard features on base models include Bluetooth connectivity, satellite radio, a USB port and a dedicated iPod interface. Optional tech treats include a navigation system that offers real-time traffic and weather updates and a sound system with digital music storage capability.
In reviews of the Acura TL, our editors hailed its abundance of high-tech amenities, its roomy cabin and its sophisticated stereo system. They called out a few missteps as well, such as the car’s bland interior and the fact that base models are hampered by uncommunicative steering and unremarkable brakes. Thanks to its much crisper handling and braking, the SH-AWD TL is a more compelling choice than the base model. The car’s exterior styling is also a question mark: Some shoppers will love it, but others will undoubtedly find it overly assertive.

Used Acura TL Models

The current (fourth) generation TL debuted for the 2009 model year. There have been no major changes since, though the manual transmission wasn’t offered in the TL’s debut year.
The third-generation TL was available for model years 2004-’08. This TL was distinguished by its chiseled exterior styling, firm suspension tuning, powerful V6 and impressive level of standard equipment. Both a six-speed manual transmission and a five-speed automatic with shift paddles were available.
Two versions of the TL were offered in this era: base and Type-S. Base-model TLs built in model years 2004 and 2005 were rated at 270 hp, while 2006 and later models were rated at 258. Note that this revision merely reflected a change in the standard horsepower rating system — the TL’s engine was unchanged.

Type-S Acuras were equipped with a 286-hp 3.5-liter V6. They also featured a sport-tuned suspension, Brembo high-performance brakes and unique styling elements that included quad tailpipes. Unfortunately for enthusiasts, the Type-S was on hiatus for the first part of the TL’s model cycle and didn’t hit the market until 2007.
Both versions of the TL came with an attractive, well-built interior designed with a more sporting intent in mind. In road tests, we were impressed with this Acura TL’s comfort and dynamic abilities but ultimately found that its front-wheel-drive setup hampered its ability to match the handling dynamics offered by top rear-drive sport sedans. The Type-S upped the performance ante somewhat, boosting power while adding crisper handling.
For a majority of shoppers, a used TL from this era will provide a good mix of fun, comfort and convenience at a reasonable price. Changes during the model cycle were few, but the TL received a midlife freshening for 2007, including minor exterior and interior styling tweaks and an upgraded navigation system.
The second-generation Acura TL was built from 1999-2003. Though less exciting than more recent models, our editors gave this TL very positive reviews during its run. Improvements were made throughout this period, and the car had a number of TL firsts, including Honda’s VTEC variable valve timing and an optional navigation system. The powerful Type-S version, which debuted in 2002, should be strongly considered by buyers interested in increased performance. Regardless of specific trim level, just about any used second-generation model should serve the used-sedan shopper well.
The original Acura TL debuted in 1995 as a replacement for the unloved Acura Vigor. Two versions were offered: a 2.5 TL with a 2.5-liter inline-5 engine and a 3.2 TL with a 3.2-liter V6. Both models were available throughout the first generation’s run, which lasted pretty much unchanged through 1998. As there is now little price difference between the two, we suggest consumers interested in a first-generation used TL go for the more powerful 3.2.

ENGINE SPECIFICATIONS

Engine type
  • Aluminum-alloy V-6
Displacement, liters
  • 3.5: TL
  • 3.7: TL SH-AWD
Valvetrain
  • Belt drive, SOHC, VTEC® 24-valve
Horsepower @ rpm (SAE net)
  • 280 @ 6200 rpm: TL
  • 305 @ 6300 rpm: TL SH-AWD
Torque @ rpm (lb-ft)
  • 254 @ 5000 rpm: TL
  • 273 @ 5000 rpm: TL SH-AWD
Compression ratio (:1)
  • 11.2
Redline
  • 6800: TL
  • 6700: TL SH-AWD
Throttle control
  • Drive-by-Wire™ throttle system
Ignition
  • Electronic direct
EPA Estimated Fuel Economy38 (city / highway / combined)
  • 20 / 29 / 23: TL
  • 18 / 26 / 21: TL SH-AWD AT
  • 17 / 25 / 20: TL SH-AWD MT
Required fuel19
  • Premium unleaded 91 octane
CARB emissions rating
  • ULEV-2
Tune-up interval3
  • No scheduled tune-ups required for 100,000 +/- miles

ACCURA TL

  ACCURA TL

                                                          The Acura TL has traditionally been one of the better choices available for a midsize luxury sport sedan. Though the TL typically does not deliver the excitement or prestige of competing European sedans, it counters with exceptional value and above-average durability and reliability.
                                         The prevailing trend is for cars to get larger and more powerful with each redesign, and such was the case with the Acura TL’s newest makeover. The current model is the largest TL yet and offers more interior room; a powerful V6 engine and available all-wheel drive help compensate for the added curb weight. Today’s TL also boasts a host of gadgets and gizmos that represent the latest in automotive technology.
                                                                          The current (fourth) generation may have upped the ante, but cutting-edge technology and bracing performance are nothing new for the TL. Older TLs are still known for their engaging handling and plentiful amenities and should make a fine choice for a used luxury sport sedan.

Current Acura TL

Now in its fourth generation, the current TL boasts a brasher look, highlighted by aggressive lines and a dramatic-looking front grille. The current model offers more interior room than the third-generation TL, as well as more power under the hood, and its ride is more compliant than its predecessor’s.
Buyers have a choice of two trims: a base model and the sportier SH-AWD. Base cars (which are front-wheel drive) are motivated by a 3.5-liter V6 that kicks out 280 horsepower. As its name suggests, the SH-AWD version is all-wheel drive, and it’s powered by a 3.7-liter V6 good for 306 hp. A five-speed automatic transmission with steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters is standard on both trims and a six-speed manual is available on the SH-AWD.
Base models are pretty well equipped, offering standard features such as 17-inch wheels, xenon headlights, a sunroof, leather upholstery and an eight-speaker stereo with an in-dash six-CD changer. In addition to all-wheel drive and a more powerful engine, the SH-AWD adds upgraded brakes, 18-inch alloy wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, sportier steering feel and performance-themed upholstery and metallic trim.
TL enthusiasts cherish the car for its cutting-edge gadgetry, and the current model does not disappoint. Standard features on base models include Bluetooth connectivity, satellite radio, a USB port and a dedicated iPod interface. Optional tech treats include a navigation system that offers real-time traffic and weather updates and a sound system with digital music storage capability.
In reviews of the Acura TL, our editors hailed its abundance of high-tech amenities, its roomy cabin and its sophisticated stereo system. They called out a few missteps as well, such as the car’s bland interior and the fact that base models are hampered by uncommunicative steering and unremarkable brakes. Thanks to its much crisper handling and braking, the SH-AWD TL is a more compelling choice than the base model. The car’s exterior styling is also a question mark: Some shoppers will love it, but others will undoubtedly find it overly assertive.

Used Acura TL Models

The current (fourth) generation TL debuted for the 2009 model year. There have been no major changes since, though the manual transmission wasn’t offered in the TL’s debut year.
The third-generation TL was available for model years 2004-’08. This TL was distinguished by its chiseled exterior styling, firm suspension tuning, powerful V6 and impressive level of standard equipment. Both a six-speed manual transmission and a five-speed automatic with shift paddles were available.
Two versions of the TL were offered in this era: base and Type-S. Base-model TLs built in model years 2004 and 2005 were rated at 270 hp, while 2006 and later models were rated at 258. Note that this revision merely reflected a change in the standard horsepower rating system — the TL’s engine was unchanged.

Type-S Acuras were equipped with a 286-hp 3.5-liter V6. They also featured a sport-tuned suspension, Brembo high-performance brakes and unique styling elements that included quad tailpipes. Unfortunately for enthusiasts, the Type-S was on hiatus for the first part of the TL’s model cycle and didn’t hit the market until 2007.
Both versions of the TL came with an attractive, well-built interior designed with a more sporting intent in mind. In road tests, we were impressed with this Acura TL’s comfort and dynamic abilities but ultimately found that its front-wheel-drive setup hampered its ability to match the handling dynamics offered by top rear-drive sport sedans. The Type-S upped the performance ante somewhat, boosting power while adding crisper handling.
For a majority of shoppers, a used TL from this era will provide a good mix of fun, comfort and convenience at a reasonable price. Changes during the model cycle were few, but the TL received a midlife freshening for 2007, including minor exterior and interior styling tweaks and an upgraded navigation system.
The second-generation Acura TL was built from 1999-2003. Though less exciting than more recent models, our editors gave this TL very positive reviews during its run. Improvements were made throughout this period, and the car had a number of TL firsts, including Honda’s VTEC variable valve timing and an optional navigation system. The powerful Type-S version, which debuted in 2002, should be strongly considered by buyers interested in increased performance. Regardless of specific trim level, just about any used second-generation model should serve the used-sedan shopper well.
The original Acura TL debuted in 1995 as a replacement for the unloved Acura Vigor. Two versions were offered: a 2.5 TL with a 2.5-liter inline-5 engine and a 3.2 TL with a 3.2-liter V6. Both models were available throughout the first generation’s run, which lasted pretty much unchanged through 1998. As there is now little price difference between the two, we suggest consumers interested in a first-generation used TL go for the more powerful 3.2.

ENGINE SPECIFICATIONS

Engine type
  • Aluminum-alloy V-6
Displacement, liters
  • 3.5: TL
  • 3.7: TL SH-AWD
Valvetrain
  • Belt drive, SOHC, VTEC® 24-valve
Horsepower @ rpm (SAE net)
  • 280 @ 6200 rpm: TL
  • 305 @ 6300 rpm: TL SH-AWD
Torque @ rpm (lb-ft)
  • 254 @ 5000 rpm: TL
  • 273 @ 5000 rpm: TL SH-AWD
Compression ratio (:1)
  • 11.2
Redline
  • 6800: TL
  • 6700: TL SH-AWD
Throttle control
  • Drive-by-Wire™ throttle system
Ignition
  • Electronic direct
EPA Estimated Fuel Economy38 (city / highway / combined)
  • 20 / 29 / 23: TL
  • 18 / 26 / 21: TL SH-AWD AT
  • 17 / 25 / 20: TL SH-AWD MT
Required fuel19
  • Premium unleaded 91 octane
CARB emissions rating
  • ULEV-2
Tune-up interval3
  • No scheduled tune-ups required for 100,000 +/- miles